Tag Archive | Acre

“The Siege of Acre, 1189-1191″ Saladin And The Crusades, from Lane-Poole, Part IV, Chapter XVII

Siege of Acre 1189-91 from medieval illustration

Siege of Acre 1189-91 from medieval illustration. (Wikicommons)

Excerpt from Chapter XVII: “……(T)he French…had put Acre under strict blockade. Saracen ships indeed still forced their way in to the relief of the garrison; one was smuggled in under a French disguise, but generally they had to run the gauntlet.

“One such adventure happened in September. Three Egyptian dromonds or ships of burthen opportunely arrived, when there was not enough food in the city to last another day. The Christian galleys were upon the new-comers in a moment. The beach was lined with the Moslem army, calling aloud upon God to save the ships.

“The Sultan himself stood there in an agony of suspense, watching the struggle, ‘like a parent robbed of his child.’ The battle raged, but fortunately for the garrison there was a fair wind, and at last the three ships sailed into the harbour safe and sound, amid the furious shouts of the enemy and the loud thanksgivings of the Faithful.”

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“The Battle of Acre, 1189″ Saladin And The Crusades, from Lane-Poole, Part IV, Chapter XVI

Excerpt from Chapter XVI: “…When the fall of Jerusalem became known in Europe, a universal cry of dismay was heard in every court and camp and village… …To recover what was lost became the passionate desire of each pious knight, the ambition of every adventurer.

“The Pope issued a trumpet-call for a new Crusade, which should wash out every sin. Richard of England, then Count of Poitou, was the first to take up the Cross. The Kings of England and France made up their quarrel and received the sacred badge from the Archbishop of Tyre. Baldwin of Canterbury preached the Crusade, in which he was later to die before Acre, and a “Saladin Tax,” a tithe of every man’s wealth, was collected throughout the length and breadth of the land. …”

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