“The Siege of Acre, 1189-1191″ Saladin And The Crusades, from Lane-Poole, Part IV, Chapter XVII

Siege of Acre 1189-91 from medieval illustration

Siege of Acre 1189-91 from medieval illustration. (Wikicommons)

Excerpt from Chapter XVII: “……(T)he French…had put Acre under strict blockade. Saracen ships indeed still forced their way in to the relief of the garrison; one was smuggled in under a French disguise, but generally they had to run the gauntlet.

“One such adventure happened in September. Three Egyptian dromonds or ships of burthen opportunely arrived, when there was not enough food in the city to last another day. The Christian galleys were upon the new-comers in a moment. The beach was lined with the Moslem army, calling aloud upon God to save the ships.

“The Sultan himself stood there in an agony of suspense, watching the struggle, ‘like a parent robbed of his child.’ The battle raged, but fortunately for the garrison there was a fair wind, and at last the three ships sailed into the harbour safe and sound, amid the furious shouts of the enemy and the loud thanksgivings of the Faithful.”

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13 thoughts on ““The Siege of Acre, 1189-1191″ Saladin And The Crusades, from Lane-Poole, Part IV, Chapter XVII

  1. I believe the single most important reason to study history is that history teaches us to ‘think’. Whether it is American, European, military, art, ancient, modern, religious, archaeological, etc. history enables us to contemplate the experiences that came before us. It is true that history is the record of our past, however I think history is more than time and place. History allows us to ‘think’ about the greatest question humanity has ever asked…..WHY? Finish the question any way you want. Studying history allows humanity to look at its own reflection. We can embrace the reflection (good and bad ) and be stronger for it, or turn away from our reflection denying we ever existed at all. Which perspective do you THINK humanity has a better chance of survival with?

  2. Used this very book when studying crusades at university. History can’t teach, people have to want to learn and I’m afraid for the men (predominantly) in power they often choose to forget what they know of history in order to keep up with courses of action they have, for one reason or another, come to regard as essential – for their own retention of power if nothing else …

    • yes, unfortunately true… but thank God for the (predominantly) men who took the time to write it down as it occurred – these accounts are as close to the actual history as we will ever find. If not the “truth” at least it is a valuable documentary witness that gives us (so many many years later) more ‘truth’ than the present media offers – for exactly the reason you state (retention of power (despite malignant incompetence)) – Thanks so much for your brilliant comment, Mary! ❤ ❤ ❤ ;^)

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