“The Conquest of Mesopotamia, 1181-1183” Saladin And The Crusades, from Lane-Poole, Part III, Chapter XI


Excerpt from Chapter XI: “…The possession of Aleppo made Saladin the most powerful ruler of Islam. From the Tigris to the Nile, and along the African coast as far as Tripoli, many great cities and different peoples owned his sway. His name was prayed for in the mosques from Mekka to Mesopotamia. When he wrote to the Pope, he even used the style, “Rex omnium regum orientalium,” and of all the eastern princes within his reach he was undoubtedly King. But to be incontestably supreme over this wide dominion he must still take another step…”

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Illustration: Silver Coin of Saladin, struck at Aleppo in A.H. 582 (1186-7)

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4 thoughts on ““The Conquest of Mesopotamia, 1181-1183” Saladin And The Crusades, from Lane-Poole, Part III, Chapter XI

    • Thanks Maria, for so many things, first for appreciating the truth! Second, that painting is awesome, I am inspired by your example to add some extra content into these posts, I never thought of that before and it’s a great idea! That painting will be included asap!
      Thanks for reading, Dear heart, and for your great comment, I’m really excited to to get started on this “upgrade” ♥♥♥ ;^)

  1. yes, a very interesting history!!. But I know the Crusades were more about greed than faith though I believe many who started out on that journey began with purer hearts and an ideal. It’s tragic that ideals also can bring about ruin for the most fervent! I’ve read lots of accounts of the Crusades including a pathetic and tragic “Children’s Crusade” that ended in disaster. Talk about exploitation of children especially the poor!
    By all accounts Saladin was an honourable man and fair.
    Oh and there is one more interesting tale – of St. Francis of Assisi who was befriended by the Sultan of Egypt Although Francis originally thought to convert the Sultan he ended up in meaningful dialogue and acceptance which is the route his faith led him – to peace, mutual respect and friendship with the Sultan. A wonderful story in a very tragic time where there was so much hatred and so many were slaughtered..

    • Oh, how interesting, what great comments. I didn’t know about the children’s crusade, how terrible… you are right about the first crusade, it was made with more pure intentions, and far better relations with the inhabitants of the countries they passed through and then resided in. Lane-Poole is an incredibly unbiased author and historian of the crusades and I really appreciate his fair treatment of this despicable period in time that is so absurdly glorified as a time of knightly chivalry… how typical of the rewriters of history, unfortunately.
      I’m quite intrigued about the history of Francis of Assisi, now that I’ve read your comment about him, I’ll definitely put him on the top of my list for the next project after I finish this one. I’m very interested in the history of Egypt from the ascent of Islam through to the modern day. My ten year plan, lol, is to keep adding material to this section of my blog, God willing!
      Thanks so much for visiting here, Cybele, and I appreciate very much your excellent contribution on the subject! ♥♥♥ ;^)

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